Brasserie Bofinger, Paris
The Oval Room at Brasserie Bofinger. (Photo by Panoramic city, Jean-Luc Dhuiq; courtesy of Bofinger)

A classic Marais brasserie in Paris

A brasserie is somewhere between a cafe and a restaurant, with great low prices and a cuisine usually based on the Franco-Germanic cooking of the Alsace region—lots of choucroute (sauerkraut, usually served with sausages or salamis—though Bofinger's chef makes a patented choucroute de la mer seafood variation).

They're also good for off-hours dining, tending to stay open continuously from noon to 1am.

The first, and still the best, brasserie in Paris is Bofinger, opened in 1864 and sporting a restored 1919–21 Art Deco decor—seen at its best in the main oval dining hall under a stained-glass skylight (though the cozy Alsatian Salon Hansi room upstairs is nice, too).

Service can be whirlwind.

 

 

 



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Salon Hansi at Brasserie Bofinger, Paris.
The Salon Hansi at Bofinger. (Photo by studio 1+1, Isabelle Dorpe et Jérémie D; courtesy of Brasserie Bofinger)

 

 

Steak frites at Brasserie Bofinger, Paris.
Steak frites. (Photo by studio 1+1, Isabelle Dorpe et Jérémie D; courtesy of Brasserie Bofinger)